Health Library Explorer
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A-Z Listings Contact Us
Health Encyclopedia
Translate

Pelvis Problems

What is the pelvis?

The pelvis is a basin-shaped structure that supports the spinal column and protects the abdominal organs. It contains the following:

Anatomy of the female pelvis
Click Image to Enlarge

Anatomy of the male pelvis
Click Image to Enlarge

  • Sacrum. A spade-shaped bone that is formed by the fusion of 5 originally separate sacral vertebrae.

  • Coccyx (also called the tail bone). Formed by the fusion of 4 originally separated coccygeal bones.

  • Three hip bones. These include the following:

    • Ilium. The broad, flaring portion of the hip bone (the crest of the pelvis).

    • Pubis. The lower, posterior part of the hip bone.

    • Ischium. One of the bones that helps form the hip.

Common pelvis problems

Two of the more common pelvic problems include the following:

  • Pelvic fractures. A pelvic fracture requires considerable force. Although the fracture itself can heal on its own, pelvic fractures usually are accompanied by damage to abdominal organs that require surgery.

    Most pelvic fractures are caused by direct blows or by a blow through the thighbone (femur). Pelvic fractures are often the result of motor vehicle accidents, especially motorcycle accidents.

  • Osteitis pubis. Osteitis pubis is an inflammation of the pubic symphysis, the slightly moveable joint of the front of the pelvis. Characterized by pain in the groin and tenderness over the front of the pelvis, this condition often is caused by repeated pelvis stress, such as kicking the ball in soccer. Rest usually heals the condition.

Online Medical Reviewer: Kolbus, Karin, RN, DNP, COHN-S
Online Medical Reviewer: MMI board-certified, academically affiliated clinician
Date Last Reviewed: 11/4/2013
© 2000-2014 Krames StayWell, 780 Township Line Road, Yardley, PA 19067. All rights reserved. This information is not intended as a substitute for professional medical care. Always follow your healthcare professional's instructions.
 

Support UTMB | For UTMB Employees | Site Index | Privacy Policy | Required Links | Contact Us

Copyright © 2013 The University of Texas Medical Branch ® Member, Texas Medical Center ®
Managed by UTMB Health Marketing and Communications. Contact us.
301 University Blvd., Galveston, TX 77555-0144